It depends on where you live. Many public places will require you to have a permit for sales. However, in a nice, family-friendly neighborhood as a kid, it would likely be fine. If you plan on selling street-crafts for a living, find out what the local regulations are and look into the costs of a stall, half shipping container or other form of suitable "pop-up shop" because you will be out there in all sorts of weather and you'll need to protect the crafts.
Please help. I turn 15 in a few weeks and live in WA and the whole state has labor laws where I have to be 16 but I really want to get a dirt bike this summer. It’s hard to find a job and everbody mows there own lawns! What should I do? How do I tell the difference between a real site that will pay for suveys and a fake one? Is it possible to make 3000 in 15 weeks?
John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Selena Maranjian owns shares of AbbVie, Amazon, Costco Wholesale, and National Grid. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon. The Motley Fool recommends Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, Costco Wholesale, Lowe's, National Grid, and The TJX Companies. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

21. Facebook – Facebook swap shops are great for selling things locally. It’s like CraigsList, but a little easier. You simply search for swap shops in your area and ask to join the group. Once you’re in, take a picture of the item, write a quick description with the price and post it. It doesn’t get much easier than that. You can generally expect to get about what you would get at a yard sale, maybe a little more.
As for other tips, all I can say is “a penny saved is a penny earned”. If you are running out of ideas to make money, start saving. Some quick “low hanging fruit” tips to save some quick cash include – switch to MetroPCS or Boost for cellphone (I only pay $20/month), switch auto insurance to Insurance Panda ($25/month), and start using GasBuddy (saves me like $100/month at least. I drive a lot).
Saving Money is Making Money.  You may have heard the saying “You can’t “outwork a bad diet”; finances are similar. Before launching your side hustle, it makes sense to sit down and look for opportunities to reduce unnecessary expenses. Now, I’m not suggesting you give up the items you and your family value and enjoy, rather let’s just trim the fat a bit.
Look, I know it’s not always realistic to pull these off; I personally wouldn’t bother trying. But if you’ve got a ton of stuff lying around — not outright junk, but stuff you don’t need, like the aforementioned DVDs and kid’s clothes — it’s worth a try. Advertise on Craigslist and put up signs in your neighborhood, then come Saturday haul a table out to your driveway (assuming you have a driveway), load it up with stuff for sale, and take whatever you can get.

Amazon makes it fairly easy to list and sell old books on its marketplace. You can make more than just a few bucks If you have pricey text books from college. Be sure the books are in good condition. You'll get negative reviews if you attempt to sell books that are falling apart. Remember, add value where you can, no matter how small it might be and no matter how few people might readily notice it. 


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