You’re already broke, and your car just conked out. Or maybe you’re cash-strapped until next week’s payday, but you’re short on rent, can’t make the minimum payment due on your credit card bill, or simply forgot you need to chip in for a birthday gift. When you’ve run out of money, there’s an endless number of reasons why you might need cash – quick.
If your goal is to make enough money to retire early, prioritize earning potential over job satisfaction, since you plan on getting out of the rat race early, anyway. Consider the types of jobs that pay extraordinarily well in exchange for hard work, little psychological satisfaction, and a punishing lifestyle, such as investment banking, sales, and engineering. If you can keep your expenses low and do this for about 10 years, you can save a nest egg for a modest but youthful retirement, or to supplement your income while you do something you really love doing but doesn't pay much. But keep in mind that delayed gratification requires clear goal-setting and strong willpower.
I recently stumbled on the Trim app and I have to say, this one is a game changer. It’s a simple app that acts as your own personal financial manager. Once you link your bank to the app, Trim analyzes your spending, finds subscriptions you need to cancel, negotiates your Comcast bill, finds you better car insurance, and more. And of course, the app is free! My bet is that it will only take a few days for Trim to put an extra $100 in your pocket. So easy!

According to the FAQ of the net.legends Usenet news group, Dave Rhodes was a student at Columbia Union College (now Washington Adventist University), a Seventh-day Adventist college in Maryland, who wrote the letter and uploaded it as a text file to a nearby BBS around 1987.[2] The earliest posting to Usenet was posted by a David Walton in 1989, also using a Columbia Union College account. Walton referred to himself as, "BIZMAN DAVE THE MODEM SLAVE", and referred to "Dave Rhodes" in his post.[3] The true identity of Dave Rhodes has not been found. A supposed self-published web site by Dave Rhodes was found to be fake.[4][5]

The scam was forwarded over e-mail and Usenet. By 1994 "Make Money Fast" became one of the most persistent spams with multiple variations.[6][7] The chain letters follow a rigidly predefined format or template with minor variations (such as claiming to be from a retired lawyer or claiming to be selling "reports" in order to attempt to make the scheme appear lawful). They quickly became repetitive, causing them to be bait for widespread satire or parody. One widespread parody begins with the subject of, "GET.ARRESTED.FAST" and the line, "Hi, I'm Dave Rhodes, and I'm in jail".[8] Another parody sent around in academic circles is, "Make Tenure Fast", substituting the sending of money to individuals on a list with listing journal citations.[9]


Hmmm… my 12 yr old daughter has gone through almost 4 different sizes in the last couple of years. I have jeans and tops, some with the tags still on them, some only worn by her once or twice. I bet I have at least 50 or more pairs of just jeans … mostly very expensive jeans!! Is there another kind,lol ? I hate to have a lot of ppl come to our home. Would I lose a lot of money by selling them online as opposed to a yard sale? I also have quite a few other items I really need to get rid of, they’re just sitting in my shed. Taking up space. Any advice on how to get the maximum $$ for these items, mainly the girl’s clothing? Thanks !!
Once you have a little bit of money, you need to start investing it. The goal, of course, is to turn your investments into a passive income stream that will pay you for the rest of your life. It doesn't take much to get started. You can get started investing with as little as $1 with these free investing apps. Then, add another $100 each month and you'll grow your nest egg into something powerful.
Rover is a dog walking and pet sitting website that is always looking for qualified dog walkers in cities all over the United States. So when you take your pup on a walk, you can also take a second (or third) dog with you and get paid to walk. 30-minute walks fall in the $10-30 range. With a neighborhood route, that can add up quickly! You’re just a short application away from getting started.
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