It depends on where you live. Many public places will require you to have a permit for sales. However, in a nice, family-friendly neighborhood as a kid, it would likely be fine. If you plan on selling street-crafts for a living, find out what the local regulations are and look into the costs of a stall, half shipping container or other form of suitable "pop-up shop" because you will be out there in all sorts of weather and you'll need to protect the crafts.
Sell items of value. Most people immediately think of selling their junk like books, DVDs, and CDs. But most people don’t want to buy those things. It’s 2018 – are you really going to buy a CD? Probably not. So don’t waste your time trying to sell it. When you’re thinking about how to make money fast, focus on items of value like laptops, TVs, phones, furniture, designer handbags or clothing.

John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Selena Maranjian owns shares of AbbVie, Amazon, Costco Wholesale, and National Grid. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon. The Motley Fool recommends Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, Costco Wholesale, Lowe's, National Grid, and The TJX Companies. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
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